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Guest Impressions

Dawah

An obvious but disturbing truth about Muslims living as minorities in non-Muslim countries is their general neglect of Da'wah among non-Muslims. Why is this so? This is a question that requires deep analysis to arrive at a correct answer. As an Ummah of one billion Muslims, da'wah to our non-Muslim neighbours and fellow countrymen hardly has any place among our goals and priorities. Very little of our resources are spent on this pivotal duty of Islam. As Muslim minority communities living within non-Muslim countries, we live totally indifferent to this primary duty to our neighbours. Neither do we make an Islamic impact on them, though we are more than a million strong in some Western countries. In India, Muslims are officially more than 130 million!

As Muslims in South Africa, we have a sacred responsibility to our fellow Muslims from the indigent and indigenous background. We are morally obliged to extend our helping hand to these families in our community. The Holy Prophet (sallallahu-alayhi-wasallam) said: "The creation (humanity) is (ultimately) the family of Allah, hence the most beloved creation in the sight of Allah are those that do good to His family." Who is going to take care of the poor and down-trodden Muslims if the Muslims of means are not going to come to their aid? The Christian Missionaries? You bet they won't waste half-a-chance to do so. If every family 'adopts' another family, a lot of work can be achieved, Insha-Allah.

Edinburgh, UK: A MONTH-LONG Islamic festival got under way in the city today with a special ceremony.
The event at Edinburgh's Central Mosque, on Potterrow, was to be attended by council leader Jenny Dawe and Lothian and Borders chief constable David Strang.

AN INTERVIEW WITH MUHTARAMAH SHEHNAAZ SAHIBAH.

Driven out of her home by a cruel stepmother, sister Shehnaaz went through a great test, finally seeing the light of Islam. She married an Aalim and found herself in the beautiful city of Madinah.Here she is interviewed by Sister Asmaa of Armughan Magazine in India. Read her moving interview. Though the article is long, it is worth the read.

Jenna Govan was born into an Australian family. Her parents divorced when she was young, and she grew up with her mother and younger brother. This small family went to church every Sunday until Govan was 10 years old. At first they used to go to the Seventh Day Adventist Church, later they went to the Baptist Church.

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